Workbook for systematic review consultations

I’m often approached by masters and PhD students and researchers in my institution to advise on systematic review projects in the early stages. I’ve found that the skill levels to complete a systematic or scoping review are variable, and that many researchers need a primer to get up to speed about the process of conducting a review, what skills are required, and in particular, how to go about the planning process.

I support many projects in depth from start to finish, but for many projects at my institution, I only have the time to provide advice and consultations. Unfortunately, I quickly learned that throwing a lot of information at people in a short period of time was not useful, and I would sometimes see the same researchers at a later consultation who hadn’t gotten very far with their projects and needed a lot of the same information again.

notebookPhoto by Glenn Carstens-Peters on Unsplash

There are many, many resources online for conducting review projects, including some enviable LibGuides (I personally like the Queens University knowledge synthesis guide and University of Toronto learning to search guide). However, I wanted a resource that I could use when physically sitting with someone in a meeting room, where we could plan out their review project together. And I was getting pretty tired of drawing the same venn diagrams of how “AND” and “OR” boolean operators work on whatever scratch paper I had handy.

I recently developed a guide that fits these purposes, and after a few iterations and some testing and feedback, I’ve put it online for others to use and edit as they wish with a CC-NC-SA 4.0 License. The goal of this guide is to provide a resource that:

  • Can be printed and used as a workbook to guide a systematic reviews consultation
  • Also contains enough information to be a stand-alone self-learning resource for after the consultation (e.g. the information on boolean operators)
  • Is not too long to be intimidating or overwhelming for someone just getting started

Without a doubt, there will be further refinements and additions to the guide over time, but for now, please feel free to download, use, and edit for your own purposes. Any feedback or comments are also gratefully accepted. 🙂

You can find the guide here at Open Science Framework.

screenshot of OSF

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